EP1 receptor

Target id: 340

Nomenclature: EP1 receptor

Family: Prostanoid receptors

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   GtoImmuPdb view: OFF :     EP1 receptor has curated GtoImmuPdb data

Gene and Protein Information
class A G protein-coupled receptor
Species TM AA Chromosomal Location Gene Symbol Gene Name Reference
Human 7 402 19p13.1 PTGER1 prostaglandin E receptor 1 18
Mouse 7 405 8 C2 Ptger1 prostaglandin E receptor 1 (subtype EP1) 11,24,79
Rat 7 405 19q11 Ptger1 prostaglandin E receptor 1 9,53
Previous and Unofficial Names
EP1 prostanoid receptor | PGE receptor EP1 subtype | prostanoid EP1 receptor | prostaglandin E receptor 1 (subtype EP1), 42kDa
Database Links
Specialist databases
GPCRDB pe2r1_human (Hs), pe2r1_mouse (Mm), pe2r1_rat (Rn)
Other databases
ChEMBL Target
DrugBank Target
Ensembl Gene
Entrez Gene
GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project
Human Protein Atlas
KEGG Gene
OMIM
RefSeq Nucleotide
RefSeq Protein
UniProtKB
Wikipedia
Natural/Endogenous Ligands
PGD2
PGE2
PGF
PGI2
Comments: PGE2 is the principal endogenous agonist
Potency order of endogenous ligands
PGE2 > PGE1 > PGF, PGI2 > PGD2, thromboxane A2

Download all structure-activity data for this target as a CSV file

Agonists
Key to terms and symbols View all chemical structures Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
[3H]PGE2 Hs Full agonist 7.6 – 7.9 pKd 1,62,83
pKd 7.6 – 7.9 (Kd 2.5x10-8 – 1x10-9 M) [1,62,83]
[3H]PGE2 Rn Full agonist 7.3 – 7.6 pKd 9,53
pKd 7.3 – 7.6 [9,53]
17-phenyl-ω-trinor-PGE2 Hs Full agonist 8.1 pKi 62
pKi 8.1 [62]
iloprost Rn Partial agonist 7.9 pKi 9
pKi 7.9 [9]
17-phenyl-ω-trinor-PGE2 Mm Full agonist 7.9 pKi 31
pKi 7.9 [31]
PGE2 Mm Full agonist 7.7 pKi 31,64
pKi 7.7 [31,64]
PGE2 Rn Full agonist 7.7 pKi 9
pKi 7.7 [9]
iloprost Mm Full agonist 7.7 pKi 31
pKi 7.7 [31]
sulprostone Mm Full agonist 7.7 pKi 31
pKi 7.7 [31]
PGE2 Hs Full agonist 7.3 – 8.0 pKi 1,62,83
pKi 7.3 – 8.0 [1,62,83]
carbacyclin Hs Full agonist 7.6 pKi 1
pKi 7.6 [1]
17-phenyl-ω-trinor-PGE2 Rn Full agonist 7.6 pKi 9
pKi 7.6 [9]
enprostil Hs Full agonist 7.1 – 7.8 pKi 1,62
pKi 7.1 – 7.8 [1,62]
PGE1 Mm Full agonist 7.4 pKi 31
pKi 7.4 [31]
ZK118182 Hs Partial agonist 7.1 pKi 62
pKi 7.1 [62]
PGE1 Rn Full agonist 7.0 pKi 9
pKi 7.0 [9]
sulprostone Rn Full agonist 7.0 pKi 9
pKi 7.0 [9]
sulprostone Hs Full agonist 6.9 – 7.0 pKi 1,62
pKi 6.9 – 7.0 [1,62]
MB-28767 Mm Full agonist 6.9 pKi 31
pKi 6.9 [31]
PGE1 Hs Full agonist 6.8 pKi 62
pKi 6.8 [62]
ZK110841 Hs Partial agonist 6.8 pKi 62
pKi 6.8 [62]
iloprost Hs Full agonist 5.6 – 8.0 pKi 1,62
pKi 5.6 – 8.0 [1,62]
ONO-DI-004 Mm Full agonist 6.8 pKi 64
pKi 6.8 [64]
enprostil Rn Full agonist 6.7 pKi 9
pKi 6.7 [9]
treprostinil Hs Full agonist 6.7 pKi 82
pKi 6.7 [82]
PGF Rn Full agonist 6.4 pKi 9
pKi 6.4 [9]
MB-28767 Hs Full agonist 6.4 pKi 1
pKi 6.4 [1]
MB-28767 Rn Full agonist 6.3 pKi 9
pKi 6.3 [9]
PGF Hs Full agonist 6.2 – 6.3 pKi 1,62
pKi 6.2 – 6.3 [1,62]
cloprostenol Hs Full agonist 5.9 – 6.1 pKi 1,62
pKi 5.9 – 6.1 [1,62]
PGF Mm Full agonist 5.9 pKi 31
pKi 5.9 [31]
cicaprost Hs Full agonist 5.9 pKi 1
pKi 5.9 [1]
PGD2 Rn Full agonist 5.2 pKi 9
pKi 5.2 [9]
U46619 Rn Full agonist 5.2 pKi 9
pKi 5.2 [9]
PGI2 Hs Full agonist 4.8 pKi 62
pKi 4.8 [62]
PGD2 Hs Full agonist 4.7 pKi 62
pKi 4.7 [62]
U46619 Hs Full agonist 4.5 pKi 1
pKi 4.5 [1]
View species-specific agonist tables
Agonist Comments
17-Phenyl PGE2 has been widely used as a EP1 standard agonist, but shows considerable EP3 agonism; ONO-D1-004 is much more selective [52,64].

Certain prostacyclin analogues exhibit high EP1 agonist activity, which may appear as partial agonism, e.g. iloprost [9,16].

A comprehensive SAR study of human EP1 agonism comparing binding and functional parameters has been published [76].
Antagonists
Key to terms and symbols View all chemical structures Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
ONO-8713 Mm Antagonist 9.5 pKi 80
pKi 9.5 [80]
ONO-8711 Hs Antagonist 9.2 pKi 81
pKi 9.2 [81]
ONO-8711 Mm Antagonist 8.8 pKi 81
pKi 8.8 [81]
MF266-1 Hs Antagonist 8.4 pKi 14
pKi 8.4 (Ki 3.6x10-9 M) [14]
ONO-8713 Hs Antagonist 8.0 pKi 56
pKi 8.0 [56]
SC-51322 Hs Antagonist 7.9 pKi 1
pKi 7.9 [1]
AH6809 Hs Antagonist 5.9 – 6.0 pKi 1,62
pKi 5.9 – 6.0 [1,62]
AH6809 Rn Antagonist 5.9 pKi 9
pKi 5.9 [9]
SC-51089 Hs Antagonist 5.9 pKi 1
pKi 5.9 [1]
SC-19220 Rn Antagonist 4.6 pKi 9
pKi 4.6 [9]
SC-19220 Hs Antagonist 4.5 pKi 62
pKi 4.5 [62]
GW848687X Hs Antagonist 8.6 pIC50 19
pIC50 8.6 (IC50 2.5x10-9 M) [19]
View species-specific antagonist tables
Antagonist Comments
SC-19220 and AH6809 have been frequently used as EP1 blockers, but have now been superseded by SC-51322 (pA2 8.1-8.4) [21-22], ONO 8711 [45] and ONO-8713 [80].
The EP1 antagonist PF-2907617-02 (PF2907617) antagonizes prostaglandin-induced contractions in bladder detrusor muscle of rats with a pKB of 8.4 [55].
Immunopharmacology Comments
Foudi et al. (2012) [17] review the presence and role of EP1-4 receptors in human inflammation and immune cells.
Primary Transduction Mechanisms
Transducer Effector/Response
Gq/G11 family Other - See Comments
Comments:  Influx of extra-cellular Ca2++.
References:  27
Secondary Transduction Mechanisms
Transducer Effector/Response
Gi/Go family Adenylate cyclase inhibition
References:  60
Tissue Distribution
Kidney: cortex, inner medulla and outer medulla.
Species:  Human
Technique:  in situ hybridisation.
References:  10
Kidney: connecting segments, cortical and medullary collecting ducts, media of arteries, media of afferent and efferent arterioles.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry.
References:  39
Eye: endothelial and smooth muscle cells of blood vessels of iris, ciliary body, and choroid. Muscle fibers of the ciliary body, retina (photoreceptors, both nuclear layers, ganglion cells).
Species:  Human
Technique:  in situ hybridisation.
References:  43,87
Eye: sclera.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR.
References:  4
Mouth: gingival fibroblasts.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  46
Eye: epithelia of the cornea, conjunctiva, lens, and ciliary body. Trabecular cells, iris vessels, retinal ganglion cells.
Species:  Human
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry.
References:  59
Presynaptic terminal of GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry.
References:  73
Kidney > lung, spleen, skeletal muscle > testes.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Northern blotting.
References:  18
Kidney > lung.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Northern blotting.
References:  79
Medium spiny neurons in the striatum.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  In situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry.
References:  32
Urothelium.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Immunocytochemistry.
References:  78
The musclaris mucosae of stomach and large intestine, neurons in the submucosa region and the muscularis mucosae layer of the stomach.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  In situ hybridisation.
References:  38,40
Gastrointestinal tract: small intestine and colon (muscle layers of the deep intestinal wall), stomach (gastric muscle layers).
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Northern blotting.
References:  15
Kidney: preglomerular arterioles.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  54
Heart: left atria.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Western blotting.
References:  84
Kidney: papilla > outer medulla > cortex.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  RNase protection assay.
References:  25
Brain: cerebellum (Purkinje cells).
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry.
References:  13
Expression Datasets

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Log average relative transcript abundance in mouse tissues measured by qPCR from Regard, J.B., Sato, I.T., and Coughlin, S.R. (2008). Anatomical profiling of G protein-coupled receptor expression. Cell, 135(3): 561-71. [PMID:18984166] [Raw data: website]

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Functional Assays
Measurement of Ca2+ levels and PI hydrolysis in CHO cells transfected with the mouse EP1 receptor.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Extracellular Ca2+ influx followed by PI hydrolysis, independent of PLC activation.
References:  27
Measurement of Ca2+ levels in CHO cells transfected with the rat EP1 receptor.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Ca2+ mobilisation.
References:  53
Measurement of Ca2 in CHO cells transfected with the mouse EP1 receptor.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Ca2+ mobilisation.
References:  79
Measurement of surfactant secretion and Ca2+ levels in cultured rat alveolar type II cells endogenously expressing the EP1 receptor.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Cultured rat alveolar type II cells.
Response measured:  Surfactant secretion via Ca2+ mobilisation.
References:  42
Measurement of Ba2+ currents in rat melanotrophs endogenously expressing the EP1 receptor.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Melanotrophs.
Response measured:  Inhibition of P/Q- and L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels.
References:  72
Measurement of cAMP levels in cultured rat microglial cells endogenously expressing the EP1 receptor, as well as production of Il-1β.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Microglial cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of cAMP accumulation and Il-1β production.
References:  12
Measurement of intracellular Ca2+ levels in COS cells transfected with the human EP1 receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  COS cells.
Response measured:  Increase in Ca2+ concentration.
References:  18
Measurement of intracellular Ca2+ levels in cultured human myometrial cells endogenously expressing the EP1 receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Cultured myometrial cells.
Response measured:  Increase in Ca2+ concentration.
References:  6
Physiological Functions
Allodynia.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  37
Mechanical analgesia.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  51
Gastric protection.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo (stomach).
References:  33
Airway constriction.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  74
Renal vasoconstriction.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo (renal artery).
References:  54
Increase in atrial contractility.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Left atrium.
References:  84
Algesia and regulation of blood pressure.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  63
Contraction of pulmonary venous smooth muscle.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Pulmonary venous preparations.
References:  47,77
Facilitation of primary bladder afferent nerve activity.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo (urinary bladder).
References:  23
Role in hyperalgesia and allodynia.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  28
Regulation of the peripheral circadian clock.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  75
Mediation of COX-2-induced cytotoxicity.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  30
Blood pressure regulation (male only).
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  7
Renal vasoconstriction.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  61
Hyperthermia.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  50
Stimulation of splenic sympathetic nerve activity.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  3
Gastric HCO3- secretion.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Stomach.
References:  70
Nitric oxide (NO) release via NMDA receptors.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Spinal cord slices.
References:  57
Inhibition of sleep.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  85
Antiproliferation and enhanced differentiation.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Growth zone chondrocytes.
References:  66
Thermal analgesia.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  49
Mediation of acid-induced visceral pain hypersensitivity.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  58
EP1 stimulation suppresses gastric emptying.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Stomach.
References:  38
EP1 receptor stimulation enhances GABAA-mediated inhibitory inputs to substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in midbrain slices.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Midbrain slices.
References:  73
EP1 receptor mediates anxiolytic-like activity of centrally administered PGE2.
Species:  Monkey
Tissue:  Brain.
References:  65
EP1 agonist induces ATP release from cultured urothelium cells.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Urothelium.
References:  78
EP1 receptor stimulation facilitates Th1 cell differentiation in vitro under the Th1 skewing conditions.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  T lymphocytes.
References:  44
Physiological Consequences of Altering Gene Expression
EP1 receptor knockout mice do not exhibit the PGE2-mediated gastric HCO3- release seen in wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  67,69
EP1 receptor knockout mice do not exhibit adaptive gastric cytoprotection, as seen in wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  5,68
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit a significant reduction in colon cancer development, compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  29
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced pain perception, reduced systolic blood pressure and increased renin-angiotensin activity.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  63
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit impaired LPS-induced ACTH release (impaired HPA axis activation).
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  34
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced NMDA neurotoxicity.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  30
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit a reduction in the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs), suggesting that EP1 receptors have a role in colon carcinogenesis.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  81
EP1 receptor knockout mice do not exhibit PGE2-induced mechanical allodynia, as seen in wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  37
EP1 receptor knockout mice do not exhibit the protective gastric effects of dimethyl-PGE2 against indomethacin, as seen in wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  33
Under social and environmental stress, EP1 receptor knockout mice have an increased dopamine turnover in the frontal cortex and striatum. They exhibit phenotypes such as behavioural disinhibition, impulsive aggression, defective social interaction, impaired cliff avoidance and exaggerated acoustic startle resonse, all of which can be reversed by dopaminergic antagonists.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  35
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced PGE2-induced airway responsiveness compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  74
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit a reduction in furosemide-stimulated enhancement of diuresis and electrolyte excretion.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  48
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit impaired social avoidance and reduced anxiety compared to wild type mice after repeated social defeat stress.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  71
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit attenuated thermal hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 and mustard oil.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  41
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit augmented ocular inflammation as examined by protein amount and leukocyte number in aqueous humor.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  8
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit suppression of cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  32
EP1 receptor knockout mice did not show shortening of intercontraction interval induced by PGE2 and EP1 agonist.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Bladder
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  78
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit impaired thermal but normal mechanical pain sensitization at the periphery to PGE2.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  26
EP1 deficient mice exhibit attenuated NMDA-induced brain lesions and Ca2+ dysregulation.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Brain.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  30
EP1 gene disruption attenuates the acute and chronic pressor responses to Ang II.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  20
EP1-deficient mice exhibit enhanced osteoblast differentiation and accelerated fracture repair.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Bone.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  86
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced contact hypersensitivity and reduced Th1 subset development in response to dinitrofluorobenzene.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  44
EP1 receptor knockout mice exhibit protection of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death and attenuated apomorphine-induced contralateral rotation on unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine injection to the medial forebrain bundle.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  in vivo
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  2
EP1 deficiency reduces amyloid plaques and confers resistance to ischemic neuronal death in APPswe/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Brain slices and neurons.
Technique:  Gene knockouts.
References:  88
Phenotypes, Alleles and Disease Models Mouse data from MGI

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Allele Composition & genetic background Accession Phenotype Id Phenotype Reference
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0008080 abnormal CD8-positive T cell differentiation PMID: 17967902 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0002351 abnormal cervical lymph node morphology PMID: 17967902 
Ptger1tm1Crjk Ptger1tm1Crjk/Ptger1tm1Crjk
B6.129S6-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0003953 abnormal hormone level PMID: 16885154 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0010698 abnormal impulsive behavior control PMID: 16247016 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0008559 abnormal interferon-gamma secretion PMID: 17967902 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0003313 abnormal locomotor activation PMID: 16247016 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0002339 abnormal lymph node morphology PMID: 17967902 
Ptger1tm1Jdm Ptger1tm1Jdm/Ptger1tm1Jdm
DBA/1LacJ-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0002736 abnormal nociception after inflammation PMID: 11160156 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd
MGI:97793  MP:0001970 abnormal pain threshold PMID: 11375261 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:97793  MP:0008872 abnormal physiological response to xenobiotic PMID: 11966527 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6Cr
MGI:97793  MP:0008872 abnormal physiological response to xenobiotic PMID: 15564292 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0005025 abnormal response to infection PMID: 12642666 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0001360 abnormal social investigation PMID: 16247016 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0008088 abnormal T-helper 1 cell differentiation PMID: 17967902 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0001625 cardiac hypertrophy PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0002664 decreased circulating adrenocorticotropin level PMID: 12642666 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0005643 decreased dopamine level PMID: 16247016 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0003912 decreased drinking behavior PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0003910 decreased eating behavior PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6Cr
MGI:97793  MP:0004502 decreased incidence of chemically-induced tumors PMID: 15564292 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0004876 decreased mean systemic arterial blood pressure PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6J
MGI:97793  MP:0008874 decreased physiological sensitivity to xenobiotic PMID: 10537280 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0005616 decreased susceptibility to type IV hypersensitivity reaction PMID: 17967902 
Ptger1tm1Jdm Ptger1tm1Jdm/Ptger1tm1Jdm
DBA/1LacJ-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0002843 decreased systemic arterial blood pressure PMID: 11160156 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0006264 decreased systemic arterial systolic blood pressure PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6Cr
MGI:97793  MP:0003447 decreased tumor growth/size PMID: 15564292 
Ptger1tm1Crjk Ptger1tm1Crjk/Ptger1tm1Crjk
B6.129S6-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0002988 decreased urine osmolality PMID: 16885154 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0003620 decreased urine output PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0006317 decreased urine sodium level PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd
MGI:97793  MP:0005407 hyperalgesia PMID: 11375261 
Ptger1tm1Dgen Ptger1tm1Dgen/Ptger1tm1Dgen
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:97793  MP:0001402 hypoactivity
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0003829 impaired febrile response PMID: 12837930 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0001354 increased aggression towards males PMID: 16247016 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6Cr
MGI:97793  MP:0001260 increased body weight PMID: 15564292 
Ptger1tm1Jdm Ptger1tm1Jdm/Ptger1tm1Jdm
DBA/1LacJ-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0008531 increased chemical nociceptive threshold PMID: 11160156 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0001906 increased dopamine level PMID: 20092576 
Ptger1tm1Jdm Ptger1tm1Jdm/Ptger1tm1Jdm
DBA/1LacJ-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0002626 increased heart rate PMID: 11160156 
Ptger1tm1Matb Ptger1tm1Matb/Ptger1tm1Matb
129S6/SvEvTac-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0004875 increased mean systemic arterial blood pressure PMID: 17710229 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:97793  MP:0008873 increased physiological sensitivity to xenobiotic PMID: 11966527 
Ptger1tm1Jdm Ptger1tm1Jdm/Ptger1tm1Jdm
DBA/1LacJ-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0005582 increased renin activity PMID: 11160156 
Ptger1tm1Sna Ptger1tm1Sna/Ptger1tm1Sna
B6.129P2-Ptger1
MGI:97793  MP:0001488 increased startle reflex PMID: 16247016 
Biologically Significant Variants
Type:  Splice variant
Species:  Rat
Description:  A variant form of the EP1 receptor, EP1-variant, has been cloned from the rat, with a 49 amino acid change and lacking the intracellular carboxy tail. This may have an effect on receptor signalling and hence attenuate the action of PGE2.
References:  53
General Comments
Mouse EP1 and β2-adrenoceptor form a heterodimer leading to uncoupling of the β2-adrenoceptor from Gαs[36].

Mouse EP1 receptor potentiates TRPV1 activity in a PKC-dependent manner in mouse DRG neurons [41].

EP1 receptor stimulation augments both dopamine D1 and D2 signaling in striatal slices [32].

References

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Mark Giembycz, Xavier Norel, Lucie Clapp, Roy Pettipher, Yukihiko Sugimoto.
Prostanoid receptors: EP1 receptor. Last modified on 09/08/2017. Accessed on 21/09/2017. IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org/GRAC/ObjectDisplayForward?objectId=340.