V<sub>1B</sub> receptor | Vasopressin and oxytocin receptors | IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY

V1B receptor

Target id: 367

Nomenclature: V1B receptor

Family: Vasopressin and oxytocin receptors

Annotation status:  image of a green circle Annotated and expert reviewed. Please contact us if you can help with updates.  » Email us

   GtoImmuPdb view: OFF :     Currently no data for V1B receptor in GtoImmuPdb

Gene and Protein Information
class A G protein-coupled receptor
Species TM AA Chromosomal Location Gene Symbol Gene Name Reference
Human 7 424 1q32 AVPR1B arginine vasopressin receptor 1B 14,43,53
Mouse 7 421 1 E4 Avpr1b arginine vasopressin receptor 1B 67
Rat 7 425 13q13 Avpr1b arginine vasopressin receptor 1B 32,44
Previous and Unofficial Names
Antidiuretic hormone receptor 1b | AVPR3 | V3 [43] | V1bR | Vasopressin V3 receptor | VPR3 | vasopressin V1b receptor | V3/V1b pituitary vasopressin receptor
Database Links
Specialist databases
GPCRDB v1br_human (Hs), v1br_mouse (Mm), v1br_rat (Rn)
Other databases
ChEMBL Target
DrugBank Target
Ensembl Gene
Entrez Gene
Human Protein Atlas
KEGG Gene
OMIM
RefSeq Nucleotide
RefSeq Protein
UniProtKB
Wikipedia
Natural/Endogenous Ligands
oxytocin {Sp: Human, Mouse, Rat}
vasopressin {Sp: Human, Mouse, Rat}
Comments: Vasopressin is the principal endogenous agonist
Potency order of endogenous ligands (Human)
vasopressin (AVP, P01185) > oxytocin (OXT, P01178)

Download all structure-activity data for this target as a CSV file

Agonists
Key to terms and symbols View all chemical structures Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
[3H]AVP (human, mouse, rat) Hs Full agonist 8.6 – 9.6 pKd 6,9,11-12,36,41,45,54-55,59-60,62,72
pKd 8.6 – 9.6 (Kd 2.51x10-9 – 2.5x10-10 M) [6,9,11-12,36,41,45,54-55,59-60,62,72]
[3H]d[Cha4]AVP Hs Full agonist 8.9 pKd 16
pKd 8.9 [16]
[3H]OT (human, mouse, rat) Hs Full agonist 5.8 pKd 60
pKd 5.8 [60]
vasopressin {Sp: Human, Mouse, Rat} Rn Full agonist 9.9 pKi 45
pKi 9.9 [45]
d[Leu4]LVP Hs Full agonist 9.8 pKi 40
pKi 9.8 [40]
d[Leu4,Dap8]VP Rn Full agonist 9.4 pKi 40
pKi 9.4 [40]
d[Cha4]AVP Hs Full agonist 9.0 – 9.7 pKi 16,25
pKi 9.0 – 9.7 [16,25]
d[D-Phe2]AVP Hs Full agonist 9.3 pKi 16
pKi 9.3 [16]
d[Leu4]AVP Hs Full agonist 9.3 pKi 8
pKi 9.3 [8]
vasopressin {Sp: Human, Mouse, Rat} Hs Full agonist 9.0 – 9.5 pKi 1,8,16,25,36,45,54-55,60,72
pKi 9.0 – 9.5 [1,8,16,25,36,45,54-55,60,72]
d[Cha4,Dab8]VP Rn Full agonist 9.1 pKi 40
pKi 9.1 [40]
[Val4]AVP Hs Full agonist 9.0 pKi 16
pKi 9.0 [16]
dAVP Hs Full agonist 8.2 – 9.4 pKi 8,16,54
pKi 8.2 – 9.4 [8,16,54]
d[Cha4]LVP Rn Full agonist 8.7 pKi 40
pKi 8.7 [40]
LVP {Sp: Pig} Hs Full agonist 8.5 pKi 60
pKi 8.5 [60]
dVDAVP Hs Full agonist 7.6 – 9.0 pKi 16,60
pKi 7.6 – 9.0 [16,60]
arginine vasotocin Hs Full agonist 8.0 pKi 60
pKi 8.0 [60]
desmopressin Rn Partial agonist 8.0 pKi 45
pKi 8.0 [45]
desmopressin Hs Full agonist 7.7 – 8.2 pKi 8,36,45,60
pKi 7.7 – 8.2 [8,36,45,60]
d[D-Pal2]AVP Hs Full agonist 7.3 – 7.9 pKi 16,47,60
pKi 7.3 – 7.9 (Ki 5x10-8 – 1.38x10-8 M) [16,47,60]
oxytocin {Sp: Human, Mouse, Rat} Hs Full agonist 5.7 – 7.0 pKi 25,45,54-55,60
pKi 5.7 – 7.0 [25,45,54-55,60]
View species-specific agonist tables
Antagonists
Key to terms and symbols View all chemical structures Click column headers to sort
Ligand Sp. Action Affinity Units Reference
nelivaptan Hs Antagonist 8.4 – 9.3 pKi 24-25,50
pKi 8.4 – 9.3 [24-25,50]
OH-LVA Hs Antagonist 8.7 pKi 60
pKi 8.7 [60]
d[Pen1,Tyr(Me)2]AVP Hs Antagonist 8.2 pKi 54
pKi 8.2 [54]
[Phaa1,D-Tyr(Me)2,Arg6,Tyr-NH29]AVP Hs Antagonist 8.0 pKi 60
pKi 8.0 [60]
[Phaa1,D-Tyr2,Val4,Arg6,Arg-NH29]AVP Hs Antagonist 7.8 pKi 60
pKi 7.8 [60]
[Phaa1,D-Tyr(Et)2,Lys6,des-Gly9]AVP Hs Antagonist 7.5 pKi 60
pKi 7.5 [60]
relcovaptan Hs Antagonist 6.3 – 7.3 pKi 25,54,60,62
pKi 6.3 – 7.3 [25,54,60,62]
d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2]AVP Hs Antagonist 6.4 – 7.0 pKi 45,54-55,60
pKi 6.4 – 7.0 [45,54-55,60]
[tBaa1,D-Tyr(Et)2,Val4,Lys6,Arg-NH28,des-Gly9]AVP Hs Antagonist 6.4 pKi 60
pKi 6.4 [60]
atosiban Hs Antagonist 6.2 – 6.6 pKi 10,49
pKi 6.2 – 6.6 [10,49]
d(CH2)5[D-Ile2,Ile4,Ala-NH2]AVP Hs Antagonist 6.3 pKi 60
pKi 6.3 [60]
d(CH2)5[D-Ile2,Ile4,Ala-NH29]AVP Hs Antagonist 6.2 pKi 60
pKi 6.2 [60]
[Phaa1,D-Tyr(Et)2,Val4,Lys6,Tyr-NH28,des-Gly9]AVP Hs Antagonist 6.1 pKi 60
pKi 6.1 [60]
d(CH2)5[Tyr(Et)2,Val4,des-Gly9]AVP Hs Antagonist 5.7 pKi 54
pKi 5.7 [54]
d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Phe(3I,4N3)-NH29]OVT Hs Antagonist 5.2 pKi 6
pKi 5.2 [6]
d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Tyr-NH29]OVT Hs Antagonist 5.0 pKi 60
pKi 5.0 [60]
mozavaptan Hs Antagonist 4.8 pKi 60
pKi 4.8 [60]
YM 471 Hs Antagonist 4.8 pKi 62
pKi 4.8 [62]
YM 218 Hs Antagonist 4.6 pKi 57
pKi 4.6 [57]
d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4]OVT Hs Antagonist 4.5 pKi 60
pKi 4.5 [60]
satavaptan Hs Antagonist 4.3 pKi 62
pKi 4.3 [62]
[3H]nelivaptan Hs Antagonist - -
Primary Transduction Mechanisms
Transducer Effector/Response
Gq/G11 family Phospholipase C stimulation
References:  48
Tissue Distribution
Pituitary, kidney.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  14
Adrenal medulla.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  22
Pancreas.
Species:  Human
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  18
Pancreas: islets of Langerhans (α-glucagon, β-insulin and δ-somatostatin cells).
Species:  Human
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry.
References:  18
Pituitary
Species:  Human
Technique:  Northern blotting.
References:  53
Brain: CA2 region of the hippocampus
Species:  Human
Technique:  In situ hybridisation and RT-PCR.
References:  74
Pituitary > hypothalamus, brain, adrenal, pancreas, colon.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  67
Pancreatic islet cells.
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  38
Brain: CA2 region of the hippocampus
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  In situ hybridisation and RT-PCR.
References:  74
Pituitary, brain (fibre projections mainly in CA2 and other hippocampal strata)
Species:  Mouse
Technique:  Receptor autoradiography
References:  33
Brain, pituitary, kidney, thymus, heart, lung, spleen, uterus, breast.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  RT-PCR, Northern blotting and in situ hybridisation.
References:  32
Adrenal medulla.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  RT-PCR.
References:  23,61
Pituitary.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Radioligand binding.
References:  2,21,28,33
Brain: olfactory bulb (mitral cell layer), suprachiasmatic nucleus, piriform cortex, CA2, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (compact region), tenia tecta, dorsal raphe, supraoptic nucleus, CA3, pontine nucleus, tuberomammillary nucleus > lateral reticular nucleus, substantia nigra pars compacta, CA1, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus, entorhinal cortex, agranular insular cortex, red nucleus (magnocellular), trigeminal nucleus (oral), ventral tegmental area, posteromedial cortical amgydala nucleus, amgydala-piriform transition, facial nucleus > inferior olivary nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, ventrolateral orbital cortex, periventricular hypothalamic area, lateral orbital cortex, locus coeruleus, trigeminal nucleus (interpola), olfactory bulb (external plexiform layer), dorsal premammillary nucleus, posterolateral cortical amgydala nucleus, gigantocellular reticular nucleus.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  in situ hybridisation.
References:  63
Brain: Olfactory system (olfactory tubercle > piriform cortex, nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract), cerebral cortex (cingulate cortex, frontal cortex > parietal cortex), basal forebrain (bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, diagonal band of Broca, fundud striati, organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis), basal ganglia (caudate putamen > nucleus accumbens), lateral septum (taenia tecta), hippocampal formation (fields of Ammon's horn > dentate gyrus), amygdala (anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus), subfornical organ, medial habenula, habenular commissure, thalamus (ventrolateral nucleus, ventral posterolateral nucleus, ventral posteromedial nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, posterior nuclear group, periventricular nucleus), hypothalamus (mediam eminence > premammilary nuclei, mammilary nuclei > medial preoptic area, periventricular nucleus, tuber cinerum, medial forebrain bundle), pons and medulla (ventral cochlea nucleus, nucleus trapezoid body), cerebellum (granule cell layers, white matter).
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Immunohistochemistry.
References:  26
Pituitary.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Northern Blotting and in situ hybridisation.
References:  42
Brain: predominantly CA2 region of the hippocampus; levels unaffected by restraint stress or adrenalectomy.
Species:  Rat
Technique:  In situ hybridisation and RT-PCR.
References:  74
Pituitary, brain (fibre projections mainly in CA2 and other hippocampal strata)
Species:  Rat
Technique:  Receptor autoradiography
References:  33
Expression Datasets

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Log average relative transcript abundance in mouse tissues measured by qPCR from Regard, J.B., Sato, I.T., and Coughlin, S.R. (2008). Anatomical profiling of G protein-coupled receptor expression. Cell, 135(3): 561-71. [PMID:18984166] [Raw data: website]

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Functional Assays
Measurement of IP accumulation in COS cells transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  COS cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of IP accumulation.
References:  14
Measurement of IP accumulation in CHO cells transfected with the mouse V1B receptor.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of IP accumulation.
References:  67
Measurement of IP accumulation in CHO cells transfected with the rat V1B receptor.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of IP accumulation.
References:  32
Measurement of IP accumulation in CHO cells transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of IP accumulation.
References:  60
Measurement of MAP kinase activation in CHO cells transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of MAP kinase activation.
References:  56
Measurement of chloride current in Xenopus oocytes transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  Xenopus oocytes.
Response measured:  Activation of Ca2+-dependent chloride current.
References:  53
Measurement of Ca2+ levels in rat adrenal glomerulosa cell primary cultures endogenously expressing the V1B receptor.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Adrenal glomerulosa cell primary cultures.
Response measured:  Stimulation of Ca2+ mobilisation.
References:  23
Measurement of Ca2+ levels in CHO cells transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of Ca2+ mobilisation.
References:  54
Measurement of arachidonic acid release in CHO cells transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of arachidonic acid release.
References:  60
Measurement of [3H]thymidine incorporation in CHO cells transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of thymidine incorporation (observed with medium density V1B expression, not with high density expression).
References:  56,60
Measurement of cAMP accumulation in CHO cells transfected with the human V1B receptor.
Species:  Human
Tissue:  CHO cells.
Response measured:  Stimulation of cAMP accumulation (observed only with high density V1B expression).
References:  60
Measurement of MAP kinase activation in CHO cells transfected with the rat V1B receptor.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  CHO cells
Response measured:  Stimulation of MAP kinase activation
References:  33
Physiological Functions
Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  58
Release of adrenocorticotropin.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Anterior pituitary cells.
References:  46,64
Potentiation of CRF-induced secretion of adrenocorticotropin.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Anterior pituitary cells.
References:  3-4,64
Stimulation of insulin release.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Pancreatic islet cells.
References:  38
Stimulation of insulin release.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Perfused pancreas.
References:  30
Stimulation of glucagon secretion.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Pancreatic islets.
References:  20
Regulation of catecholamine secretion.
Species:  Rat
Tissue:  Adrenal medullary primary cultures.
References:  23
Regulation of stress-induced catecholamine release.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  In vivo.
References:  27
Physiological Consequences of Altering Gene Expression
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced adrenocorticotropin secretion to acute insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and to repeated restraint stress compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  34
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced aggression compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  69
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced basal adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone levels, an impaired rise in adrenocorticotropin in response to AVP and no difference in CRF-induced adrenocorticotropin release compared to wild-type mice.
Under stressed conditions, adrenocorticotropin release is supressed in V1B receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type.
Primary cultured pituitary cells from V1B knockout mice exhibit reduced adrenocorticotropin release in response to AVP.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  58
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced levels of prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and reduced acoustic startle response.
They also have reduced basal levels of extracellular dopamine in the medial frontal cortex.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  17
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit altered stres-induced catecholamine release compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  27
V1B receptor knockout mice do exhibit OT- and AVP-induced glucagon secretion as seen in wild-type mice due to compensation by the OT receptor.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  20
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit normal behavioural responses to acute, intoxicating doses of ethanol compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  7
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone levels in response to lipopolysaccharide challenge and ethanol administration compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  35
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit increased water intake and urine volume, and decreased body temperature and oxygen consumption compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  13
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit a reduced attack component of aggressive behaviour compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  68
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit enhanced sensitivity to insulin compared to wild-type mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  19
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit an impaired Bruce effect (process by which exposure to chemosensory cues from an unfamiliar male terminates pregnancy in a recently mated female) compared to wild-type (and vasopressin V1A receptor knockout) mice.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells.
References:  70
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced ACTH (but not necessarily corticosterone) responses to acute and repeated restraint, forced swimming and novel environment stress.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embyronic stem cells
References:  51
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit impaired AVP-potentiated, CRF-induced insulin secretion.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue:  Isolated pancreatic β-islet cells
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells
References:  37
V1B receptor knockout mice have reduced ACTH and corticosterone responses to antidepressant administration.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells
References:  52
V1B receptor and V1A receptor double knockout mice exhibit altered circadian rhythm behaviour, clock gene expression, and body temperature.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells
References:  71
V1B receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced aggression; behaviour restored by intra-hippocampal CA2 injection of a lentiviral V1B receptor construct.
Species:  Mouse
Tissue: 
Technique:  Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells; lentiviral-based V1B receptor functional rescue
References:  39
Phenotypes, Alleles and Disease Models Mouse data from MGI

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Allele Composition & genetic background Accession Phenotype Id Phenotype Reference
Avpr1btm1Wsy Avpr1btm1Wsy/Avpr1btm1Wsy
involves: 129S4/SvJae * C57BL/6
MGI:1347010  MP:0001360 abnormal social investigation PMID: 12399951 
Avpr1btm1Wsy Avpr1btm1Wsy/Avpr1btm1Wsy
involves: 129S4/SvJae * C57BL/6
MGI:1347010  MP:0005656 decreased aggression PMID: 12399951 
Avpr1btm1Gzt Avpr1btm1Gzt/Avpr1btm1Gzt
involves: 129/Sv * C57BL/6J
MGI:1347010  MP:0002664 decreased circulating adrenocorticotropin level PMID: 14722621 
Avpr1btm1Gzt Avpr1btm1Gzt/Avpr1btm1Gzt
involves: 129/Sv * C57BL/6J
MGI:1347010  MP:0002665 decreased circulating corticosterone level PMID: 14722621 
Avpr1btm1Wsy Avpr1btm1Wsy/Avpr1btm1Wsy
involves: 129S4/SvJae * C57BL/6
MGI:1347010  MP:0002781 increased circulating testosterone level PMID: 12399951 
Avpr1btm1Dgen Avpr1btm1Dgen/Avpr1btm1Dgen
involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
MGI:1347010  MP:0002906 increased susceptibility to pharmacologically induced seizures
Avpr1btm1Gzt Avpr1btm1Gzt/Avpr1btm1Gzt
involves: 129/Sv * C57BL/6J
MGI:1347010  MP:0002768 small adrenal glands PMID: 14722621 
Biologically Significant Variants
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism
Species:  Human
Description:  A SNP in the exonic region of the V1B receptor gene may contribute (with CRFR1 polymorphisms) to the susceptibility to panic disorder.
Amino acid change:  R364H
SNP accession: 
References:  29
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism
Species:  Human
Description:  A SNP in the V1B receptor gene may be associated with the vulnerability to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
SNP accession: 
References:  66
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism
Species:  Human
Description:  A SNP in the V1B receptor gene may alter susceptibility to bipolar disorder with psychotic features.
Nucleotide change:  C>T
SNP accession: 
References:  31
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism
Species:  Human
Description:  A SNP in the V1B receptor gene may be associated with mood and anxiety outcomes in suicidal attempts.
Amino acid change:  G191R
SNP accession: 
References:  5
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism
Species:  Human
Description:  A SNP in the V1B receptor gene may be associated with childhood-onset mood disorders.
Amino acid change:  K65N
SNP accession: 
References:  15
Type:  Single nucleotide polymorphism
Species:  Human
Description:  A SNP in the V1B receptor gene may contribute to protection against recurrent major depression.
References:  65
General Comments
AVP released in the portal blood acts as a potent secretagogue of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) through its action on the V1B receptor. This receptor mediates the release of ACTH and beta-endorphin from the anterior pituitary through the mobilisation of intracellular calcium by phosphatidyl inositol hydrolysis [21]. The V1B receptor heterodimerises with the corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor in vitro [73]. The presence of the V1B receptor has also been reported in other organs such as the brain, the adrenals, and the pancreas [32]. A potent, selective, and orally active V1B receptor antagonist has been recently described. It has antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties [24].

References

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1. Akerlund M, Bossmar T, Brouard R, Kostrzewska A, Laudanski T, Lemancewicz A, Serradeil-Le Gal C, Steinwall M. (1999) Receptor binding of oxytocin and vasopressin antagonists and inhibitory effects on isolated myometrium from preterm and term pregnant women. Br J Obstet Gynaecol, 106: 1047-1053. [PMID:10519430]

2. Antoni FA. (1984) Novel ligand specificity of pituitary vasopressin receptors in the rat. Neuroendocrinology, 39: 186-188. [PMID:6089020]

3. Antoni FA, Holmes MC, Makara GB, Kárteszi M, László FA. (1984) Evidence that the effects of arginine-8-vasopressin (AVP) on pituitary corticotropin (ACTH) release are mediated by a novel type of receptor. Peptides, 5: 519-522. [PMID:6089144]

4. Baertschi AJ, Friedli M. (1985) A novel type of vasopressin receptor on anterior pituitary corticotrophs?. Endocrinology, 116: 499-502. [PMID:2981663]

5. Ben-Efraim YJ, Wasserman D, Wasserman J, Sokolowski M. (2013) Family-based study of AVPR1B association and interaction with stressful life events on depression and anxiety in suicide attempts. Neuropsychopharmacology, 38 (8): 1504-11. [PMID:23422793]

6. Breton C, Chellil H, Kabbaj-Benmansour M, Carnazzi E, Seyer R, Phalipou S, Morin D, Durroux T, Zingg HH, Barberis C, Mouillac B. (2001) Direct identification of human oxytocin receptor-binding domains using a photoactivatable cyclic peptide antagonist: comparison with the human V1a vasopressin receptor. J Biol Chem, 276: 26931-26941. [PMID:11337500]

7. Caldwell HK, Stewart J, Wiedholz LM, Millstein RA, Iacangelo A, Holmes A, Young WS, Wersinger SR. (2006) The acute intoxicating effects of ethanol are not dependent on the vasopressin 1a or 1b receptors. Neuropeptides, 40: 325-337. [PMID:17049983]

8. Cheng LL, Stoev S, Manning M, Derick S, Pena A, Mimoun MB, Guillon G. (2004) Design of potent and selective agonists for the human vasopressin V1b receptor based on modifications of [deamino-cys1]arginine vasopressin at position 4. J Med Chem, 47: 2375-2388. [PMID:15084136]

9. Chini B, Mouillac B, Ala Y, Balestre MN, Trumpp-Kallmeyer S, Hoflack J, Elands J, Hibert M, Manning M, Jard S et al.. (1995) Tyr115 is the key residue for determining agonist selectivity in the V1a vasopressin receptor. EMBO J., 14 (10): 2176-82. [PMID:7774575]

10. Cirillo R, Gillio Tos E, Schwarz MK, Quattropani A, Scheer A, Missotten M, Dorbais J, Nichols A, Borrelli F, Giachetti C, Golzio L, Marinelli P, Thomas RJ, Chevillard C, Laurent F, Portet K, Barberis C, Chollet A. (2003) Pharmacology of (2S,4Z)-N-[(2S)-2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl]-4-(methoxyimino) -1-[(2'-methyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)carbonyl]-2-pyrrolidinecarboxamide, a new potent and selective nonpeptide antagonist of the oxytocin receptor. J Pharmacol Exp Ther, 306: 253-261. [PMID:12660315]

11. Cotte N, Balestre MN, Aumelas A, Mahe E, Phalipou S, Morin D, Hibert M, Manning M, Durroux T, Barberis C, Mouillac B. (2000) Conserved aromatic residues in the transmembrane region VI of the V1a vasopressin receptor differentiate agonist vs. antagonist ligand binding. Eur J Biochem, 267: 4253-4263. [PMID:10866830]

12. Cotte N, Balestre MN, Phalipou S, Hibert M, Manning M, Barberis C, Mouillac B. (1998) Identification of residues responsible for the selective binding of peptide antagonists and agonists in the V2 vasopressin receptor. J Biol Chem, 273: 29462-29468. [PMID:9792651]

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Stephen Lolait, Daniel Bichet, Michel Bouvier, Bice Chini, Gerald Gimpl, Gilles Guillon, Tadashi Kimura, Mark Knepper, Maurice Manning, Bernard Mouillac, Claudine Serradeil-Le Gal, Melvyn Soloff, Joseph G. Verbalis, Mark Wheatley, Hans H. Zingg.
Vasopressin and oxytocin receptors: V1B receptor. Last modified on 27/02/2018. Accessed on 17/11/2018. IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org/GRAC/ObjectDisplayForward?objectId=367.