Trace amine receptor

Unless otherwise stated all data on this page refer to the human proteins. Gene information is provided for human (Hs), mouse (Mm) and rat (Rn).

Overview

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Trace amine-associated receptors were initially discovered as a result of a search for novel 5-HT receptors [1], where 15 mammalian orthologues were identified and divided into two families. The TA1 receptor (nomenclature as agreed by the NC-IUPHAR Subcommittee for the Trace amine receptor [4]) has been shown to have affinity for the endogenous trace amines tyramine, β-phenylethylamine and octopamine in addition to the classical amine dopamine [1]. Emerging evidence suggests that TA1 is a modulator of monoaminergic activity in the brain [8] with TA1 and dopamine D2 receptors shown to form constitutive heterodimers when co-expressed [3]. In addition to trace amines, receptors can be activated by amphetamine-like psychostimulants, and endogenous thyronamines such as thyronamine and 3-iodothyronamine.

Receptors

TA1 receptor Show summary » More detailed page

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NC-IUPHAR subcommittee and family contributors

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How to cite this family page

Database page citation:

Janet J. Maguire, Anthony P. Davenport, Tom I. Bonner, Stephen M. Foord, William A.E. Parker. Trace amine receptor. Accessed on 24/05/2016. IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org/GRAC/FamilyDisplayForward?familyId=64.

Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY citation:

Alexander SPH, Davenport AP, Kelly E, Marrion N, Peters JA, Benson HE, Faccenda E, Pawson AJ, Sharman JL, Southan C, Davies JA and CGTP Collaborators (2015) The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: G protein-coupled receptors. Br J Pharmacol. 172: 5744-5869.